Self-Regulation

Self-Regulation: An Introduction

Author: Dominion Learning Institute

1 ECE Hour

Learning Continuum: Foundation

The ability to self-regulate, emerging in the first few years of life, may be the most important factor in determining academic success in later school years. What is self-regulation, how does it develop and what are the implications for early childhood programs?  This module is the first in a series of articles considering what research in this area is telling us about best practice.

Webinar - Self-Regulation: An Introduction

Author: Dominion Learning Institute

1 ECE Hour

Learning Continuum: Foundation

The ability to self-regulate, emerging in the first few years of life, may be the most important factor in determining academic success in later school years. What is self-regulation, how does it develop and what are the implications for early childhood programs?  This module is the first in a series of articles considering what research in this area is telling us about best practice.

Supporting Self-Regulation in Infant and Toddlers

Author: Dominion Learning institute

1 ECE Hour

Learning Continuum: Foundation

This module explores two of the five areas where young children need to develop self-regulation strategies as identified by Canadian expert, Dr. Stuart Shanker. Explore the skills and challenges for children in aspects of  biological (temperament and physiology) and emotional regulation. 

Biological Self-Regulation

Author: Dominion Learning institute

1 ECE Hour

Learning Continuum: Foundation

This module will look at the first of the five areas, biology and temperament, where young children need to develop self-regulation strategies, focusing on the skills and challenges for children within each aspect. Individual sensitivities and differences that present ongoing challenges for self-regulation will be discussed.

Emotional Self-Regulation

Author: Dominion Learning institute

1 ECE Hour

Learning Continuum: Foundation

This module will look at the area of emotional literacy and emotion regulation, including the impact of strong emotions, and how young children can learn to express emotions in adaptive ways. The crucial role of a sensitive and responsive adult will be highlighted, especially for children dealing with complex or adverse situations.

Regulation of Attention and Engagement

Author: Dominion Learning institute

1 ECE Hour

Learning Continuum: Foundation

Successful self-regulation contributes to better relationships, mental health and learning.  As with biological and emotional regulation, children’s attention and focus on learning moves up and down the continuum of arousal in response to their own needs and situations they find themselves in. ​ Stuart Shanker (2012) describes the cognitive factors – sustained attention, attention switching, dealing with frustration and delay, which need to be mastered. These factors are closely related to the development of executive function, which will also be addressed in this module.

Self-Regulation and Social Competence

Author: Dominion Learning institute

1 ECE Hour

Learning Continuum: Foundation

This module will look at children’s developing abilities to interact successfully and work together within a group. Understanding how a child manages her or his own emotions, behaviour and social stress is crucial to supporting a sense of belonging and positive relationships, and children bring complex needs into this process.

Understanding Differences in Expression of Early Aggression

Author: Centre of Excellence for Early Childhood Excellence

1 ECE Hour

Learning Continuum: Foundation

 Sex differences in frequency and level of physical aggression have been consistently reported. Scientists have proposed both social and biological explanations for this difference. Higher levels of physical aggression for boys have been reported by mothers from 17 months of age. Sex differences in aggression therefore appear before they could be extensively affected by socialization. Even though most children show a decrease in the frequency of physical aggression as they grow up, girls tend to reduce their aggression earlier, and the sex differences tend to stay stable through childhood and adolescence. 

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